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Recipes for Fall: Slow Cooker Beef Ragu

This hearty sauce is best served over a short pasta with lots of nooks and crannies it can tuck into and cling to. This rag? also makes a delicious lasagna filling when layered with sheets of fresh pasta and ricotta and mozzarella cheeses.
Click here for the complete recipe.

Slow cookers: There’s no more foolproof way to cook. For more slow cooker recipes, check out Canadian Living’s New Slow Cooker Favourites, available now!

Recipes for Fall: Slow Cooker Beef Ragu

This hearty sauce is best served over a short pasta with lots of nooks and crannies it can tuck into and cling to. This rag? also makes a delicious lasagna filling when layered with sheets of fresh pasta and ricotta and mozzarella cheeses.

Click here for the complete recipe.

Slow cookers: There’s no more foolproof way to cook. For more slow cooker recipes, check out Canadian Living’s New Slow Cooker Favourites, available now!

Indigo is taking over the Simon & Schuster Canada Tumblr today with an exclusive Q&A with comedian Grace Helbig, author of Grace’s Guide.
1.      How did you find time to write this book?
To be honest, I have no idea. It happened in between creating weekly video content, releasing an independent film, and performing a live comedy tour. Sleep was that friend who kept asking me to hang out but I was all, “I can’t tonight, how about next week?” And when we finally got reunited, we picked up exactly where we left off. Sleeping.
2.      What was your inspiration for writing your book?
I got into a phase of reading self-help books after I graduated college. Some were helpful and some took themselves too seriously. I wanted to write a self- help-esque book that was stupid and serious at the same time. Something that felt both conversational and informative. When you read it, I want it to feel like you’re talking with a friend. Your friend who happens to be a 14-year-old trapped in a 29-year-old’s body 
3.      Past Grace is given future Grace’s book but can only read one chapter. Which chapter would future Grace recommend past Grace to read? 
The chapter about handling anxiety. It was the most personal to write and the one I’ve gotten the most sincere feedback on so far. I haven’t talked about my anxiety too openly before and it seems like it’s definitely something a lot of people deal with in different ways. Anxiety is very trendy, y’all!  
4.      At what age do you think you’ll officially feel like a grown-up?
I hope I never officially feel like a grown-up. 
5.      Any plans to write another book?
Any plan to MIND YO BUSINESS? Sike! Just kidding! I would LOVE to write another book.
6.      Is Goose back from training yet? If so, how is she doing now?
lol. I wish she was more evolved and could hear and understand that someone asked about her. She’s been back for a week and a half and will go back into some more training while I’m on tour. She’s doing better. She’s a unique creature, that’s why I love her.
7.      What’s your favourite book?
Harold and the Purple Crayon

8.      What’s your favourite soup?
French fries
9.      What song should Canadians listen to, to help us survive the coming cold weather?
“She Bangs” by the greatest Canadian I know, Ricky Martin 

Pick up a copy of Grace’s Guide: The Art of Pretending to be a Grown-Up today! Meet Grace in Toronto on October 29.

Indigo is taking over the Simon & Schuster Canada Tumblr today with an exclusive Q&A with comedian Grace Helbig, author of Grace’s Guide.

1.      How did you find time to write this book?

To be honest, I have no idea. It happened in between creating weekly video content, releasing an independent film, and performing a live comedy tour. Sleep was that friend who kept asking me to hang out but I was all, “I can’t tonight, how about next week?” And when we finally got reunited, we picked up exactly where we left off. Sleeping.

2.      What was your inspiration for writing your book?

I got into a phase of reading self-help books after I graduated college. Some were helpful and some took themselves too seriously. I wanted to write a self- help-esque book that was stupid and serious at the same time. Something that felt both conversational and informative. When you read it, I want it to feel like you’re talking with a friend. Your friend who happens to be a 14-year-old trapped in a 29-year-old’s body 

3.      Past Grace is given future Grace’s book but can only read one chapter. Which chapter would future Grace recommend past Grace to read? 

The chapter about handling anxiety. It was the most personal to write and the one I’ve gotten the most sincere feedback on so far. I haven’t talked about my anxiety too openly before and it seems like it’s definitely something a lot of people deal with in different ways. Anxiety is very trendy, y’all!  

4.      At what age do you think you’ll officially feel like a grown-up?

I hope I never officially feel like a grown-up. 

5.      Any plans to write another book?

Any plan to MIND YO BUSINESS? Sike! Just kidding! I would LOVE to write another book.

6.      Is Goose back from training yet? If so, how is she doing now?

lol. I wish she was more evolved and could hear and understand that someone asked about her. She’s been back for a week and a half and will go back into some more training while I’m on tour. She’s doing better. She’s a unique creature, that’s why I love her.

7.      What’s your favourite book?

Harold and the Purple Crayon

8.      What’s your favourite soup?

French fries

9.      What song should Canadians listen to, to help us survive the coming cold weather?

She Bangs” by the greatest Canadian I know, Ricky Martin 

Pick up a copy of Grace’s Guide: The Art of Pretending to be a Grown-Up today! Meet Grace in Toronto on October 29.

This week is Autism Awareness Week in Canada.

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life: it is the result of a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain. Autism and its associated behaviours have been estimated to occur in as many as 1 in 500 individuals. It is four times more prevalent in boys than girls and includes persons from all racial, ethnic, social, family income, lifestyle, and formal education level sectors.

In 2012, it was declared that every April 2nd will be recognized as International Autism Awareness day. In Canada, we also recognize October as Autism Awareness month, but this is something we need to think about all year, as every day affords us a special chance to make others aware of this disability of increasing proportion.

We’ve put together a reading list with some essential reads about autism.

Carly’s Voice

Chicken Soup for the Soul: Raising Kids on the Spectrum 

Love Anthony

Anything But Typical

House Rules

Recipes for Fall: Slow Cooker Tomato and Sausage Pasta

Let the gentle simmer of your slow cooker do the work for you. Spend a few minutes prepping the ingredients before you head out for the day and be greeted in the evening by the warming aroma of this chunky, rich pasta sauce. 
Click here for the complete recipe.

We’re drooling.
For more slow cooker recipes, check out Canadian Living’s New Slow Cooker Favourites, available now!

Recipes for Fall: Slow Cooker Tomato and Sausage Pasta

Let the gentle simmer of your slow cooker do the work for you. Spend a few minutes prepping the ingredients before you head out for the day and be greeted in the evening by the warming aroma of this chunky, rich pasta sauce. 

Click here for the complete recipe.

We’re drooling.

For more slow cooker recipes, check out Canadian Living’s New Slow Cooker Favourites, available now!

October is here! Here’s a selection of creepy book covers to amp you up for Halloween.

The Replacement by Brenna Yovanoff

Unwind By Neal Shusterman

The Collector by John Fowles

Servants of the Storm by Delilah S. Dawson

You by Caroline Kepnes

Suffer the Children by Craig DiLouie

I, Ripper by Stephen Hunter

The Demonologist by Andrew Pyper

The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer by Michelle Hodkin

 

Can you think of any spooky covers to add?

Mini Madeleines
Skill Level: BeginnerTime: 15 minutes one day before; 15 minutes per batch the day ofYield: 100 mini madeleines8 tablespoons (115 grams) Unsalted butter 1 tablespoon (15 grams) Dark brown sugar 2 teaspoons (15 grams) Honey1/2 cup (100 grams) Granulated sugar1/2 teaspoon (1 gram) Kosher salt1 cup (120 grams) All-purpose flour, sifted1/2 teaspoon (4 grams) Baking powder3 Whole eggs (large), at room temperature1/2 lemon, Grated lemon zest1/2 orange, Grated orange zestNonstick cooking spray as needConfectioner’s sugar (for serving) as needed
ONE DAY BEFOREMake Batter1. Melt the butter, brown sugar, and honey in a medium pot over low heat. Stir gently with a heatproof spatula to ensure that nothing burns. Keep the mixture warm over very low hear, or reheat if necessary.* 
2. Combine the granulated sugar, salt, flour, and baking powder in a large bowl and mix well with a whisk. Form a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the eggs one by one, whisking to incorporate each before adding the next.±
3. When the eggs are fully incorporated and the batter is smooth, slowly whisk in the butter mixture. Whisk in the lemon and orange zests. The batter will still be runny and similar in consistency to cake batter. Cover with the plastic wrap pressed directly onto the surface of the batter, to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate overnight to rest. ‡
THE DAY OFPipe, Bake, and Serve1. Place a rack in the centre of the oven and preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C) for conventional or 350ºF (175ºC) for convection.§
2. Using a rubber spatula, place 2 large scoops of batter in a piping bag so that it is one-third full. Push the batter down toward the tip of the bag.
3. Cut an opening about ½ inch (1.25 cm) straight across the tip of the bag.
4. Hold the nonstick cooking spray about 4 inches (10 cm) away from a nonstick mini madeleine pan and spray evenly in all the cavities.
5. Holding the piping bag at a 90-degree angle about ½ inch (1.25 cm) above the pan, pipe the madeleine batter into the cavities so that it fills each about three-quarters of the way to the top.
6. Bake the madeleines for 2 to 2½ minutes on the center rack. When you see the batter puff up in the center, rotate the pan 180 degrees. Bake for 2 to 2½ minutes more, until the sides of the madeleines are golden blond and the center has set.
7. Unmold immediately. Bang the corner or sides of the madeleine pan against your work surface so that the fresh madeleines drop out.**
*Using different types of honey is a great way to naturally flavor madeleines. I love acacia and wildflower honeys.
±Use room temperature eggs to avoid cooling down the batter. If the batter is too cold, the butter may congeal when you add it.
‡Many recipes containing baking powder do well to rest overnight. This helps with rising, which is especially important for the madeleine—a pastry that puffs up in the center when it bakes.
§ In general for baking pastries, set your oven to convection if the option is available. This allows the heat to flow more evenly. It’s an ideal setting because it helps pastries bake evenly on all sides.
** If you find that the madeleines stick to the mold, for the next batch, try spraying a bit more cooking spray. Also, keeping the mold clean and washing it thoroughly with a soft sponge after use will also prevent the madeleines from sticking.
For more delicious recipes like the original CRONUT, pick up a copy of Dominique Ansel’s The Secret Recipes. 

Mini Madeleines

Skill Level: Beginner
Time: 15 minutes one day before; 15 minutes per batch the day of
Yield: 100 mini madeleines

8 tablespoons (115 grams) Unsalted butter 
1 tablespoon (15 grams) Dark brown sugar 
2 teaspoons (15 grams) Honey
1/2 cup (100 grams) Granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon (1 gram) Kosher salt
1 cup (120 grams) All-purpose flour, sifted
1/2 teaspoon (4 grams) Baking powder
3 Whole eggs (large), at room temperature
1/2 lemon, Grated lemon zest
1/2 orange, Grated orange zest
Nonstick cooking spray as need
Confectioner’s sugar (for serving) as needed

ONE DAY BEFORE
Make Batter
1. Melt the butter, brown sugar, and honey in a medium pot over low heat. Stir gently with a heatproof spatula to ensure that nothing burns. Keep the mixture warm over very low hear, or reheat if necessary.* 

2. Combine the granulated sugar, salt, flour, and baking powder in a large bowl and mix well with a whisk. Form a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the eggs one by one, whisking to incorporate each before adding the next.±

3. When the eggs are fully incorporated and the batter is smooth, slowly whisk in the butter mixture. Whisk in the lemon and orange zests. The batter will still be runny and similar in consistency to cake batter. Cover with the plastic wrap pressed directly onto the surface of the batter, to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate overnight to rest. 

THE DAY OF
Pipe, Bake, and Serve
1. Place a rack in the centre of the oven and preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C) for conventional or 350ºF (175ºC) for convection.§

2. Using a rubber spatula, place 2 large scoops of batter in a piping bag so that it is one-third full. Push the batter down toward the tip of the bag.

3. Cut an opening about ½ inch (1.25 cm) straight across the tip of the bag.

4. Hold the nonstick cooking spray about 4 inches (10 cm) away from a nonstick mini madeleine pan and spray evenly in all the cavities.

5. Holding the piping bag at a 90-degree angle about ½ inch (1.25 cm) above the pan, pipe the madeleine batter into the cavities so that it fills each about three-quarters of the way to the top.

6. Bake the madeleines for 2 to 2½ minutes on the center rack. When you see the batter puff up in the center, rotate the pan 180 degrees. Bake for 2 to 2½ minutes more, until the sides of the madeleines are golden blond and the center has set.

7. Unmold immediately. Bang the corner or sides of the madeleine pan against your work surface so that the fresh madeleines drop out.**

*Using different types of honey is a great way to naturally flavor madeleines. I love acacia and wildflower honeys.

±Use room temperature eggs to avoid cooling down the batter. If the batter is too cold, the butter may congeal when you add it.

‡Many recipes containing baking powder do well to rest overnight. This helps with rising, which is especially important for the madeleine—a pastry that puffs up in the center when it bakes.

§ In general for baking pastries, set your oven to convection if the option is available. This allows the heat to flow more evenly. It’s an ideal setting because it helps pastries bake evenly on all sides.

** If you find that the madeleines stick to the mold, for the next batch, try spraying a bit more cooking spray. Also, keeping the mold clean and washing it thoroughly with a soft sponge after use will also prevent the madeleines from sticking.

For more delicious recipes like the original CRONUT, pick up a copy of Dominique Ansel’s The Secret Recipes